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Jackie Brannon Correctional Center Reaches 100 Percent Staffing for Correctional Officers

Nov 12, 2015 | by Lynn Powell

McALESTER – After a recent cadet graduation, the Jackie Brannon Correctional Center (JBCC) is at 100 percent staffing for correctional officers. According to Department of Corrections (DOC) recruiting records, the JBCC facility is the only fully staffed prison in the state. A recent spike in applicants for correctional officer positions has led to more academies and the DOC adding a special academy to accommodate the waiting list. The DOC is approximately 28 percent understaffed for correctional officers, a 12 percent decrease since July.

McALESTER – After a recent cadet graduation, the Jackie Brannon Correctional Center (JBCC) is at 100 percent staffing for correctional officers.

According to Department of Corrections (DOC) recruiting records, the JBCC facility is the only fully staffed prison in the state.

A recent spike in applicants for correctional officer positions has led to more academies and the DOC adding a special academy to accommodate the waiting list. The DOC is approximately 28 percent understaffed for correctional officers, a 12 percent decrease since July.

“It’s a relief to have a fully staffed facility,” JBCC Warden Jerry Chrisman said. “We have strong leadership with our current correctional officers, who will mentor the younger officers and show them what it takes to succeed in this career. They are in good hands and will be learning from the best.”

Last month, DOC Director Robert Patton sent a citation to the facility to commend the staff for their work. Director Patton has worked in corrections for more than 30 years and started as a correctional officer.

“The job of a correctional officer is not an easy one,” said Patton. “It takes heart, determination and guts to get up every day and face the challenges of working on a prison yard. It is more than a career. I appreciate Warden Chrisman’s effort to creating a motivational atmosphere and a place where people want to lace up their boots and come to work every day.”

Director Patton has recently been hosting monthly roundtable discussions with shift supervisors and others in leadership roles from across the state to talk about how the DOC can help attract and retain officers as well as how the DOC can continue to work together to protect the public.

Starting pay for officers is $2,214.43 per month with two salary increases within the first 18 months of employment. Included with their employment, officers receive full health insurance for their families.

“You can’t beat the benefits,” Correctional Officer and recent academy graduate Joshua Middleton said. “I had several opportunities in the area, but DOC had the best benefits and I am able to give back to the community in a way I wouldn’t have found in a different position at another place of employment.”

Middleton graduated from the SE Region Cadet Academy on Aug. 21. He and 4 of his fellow officers joined the approximately 1,500 correctional officers serving the state’s 17 facilities.

McALESTER – After a recent cadet graduation, the Jackie Brannon Correctional Center (JBCC) is at 100 percent staffing for correctional officers.

According to Department of Corrections (DOC) recruiting records, the JBCC facility is the only fully staffed prison in the state.

A recent spike in applicants for correctional officer positions has led to more academies and the DOC adding a special academy to accommodate the waiting list. The DOC is approximately 28 percent understaffed for correctional officers, a 12 percent decrease since July.

“It’s a relief to have a fully staffed facility,” JBCC Warden Jerry Chrisman said. “We have strong leadership with our current correctional officers, who will mentor the younger officers and show them what it takes to succeed in this career. They are in good hands and will be learning from the best.”

Last month, DOC Director Robert Patton sent a citation to the facility to commend the staff for their work. Director Patton has worked in corrections for more than 30 years and started as a correctional officer.

“The job of a correctional officer is not an easy one,” said Patton. “It takes heart, determination and guts to get up every day and face the challenges of working on a prison yard. It is more than a career. I appreciate Warden Chrisman’s effort to creating a motivational atmosphere and a place where people want to lace up their boots and come to work every day.”

Director Patton has recently been hosting monthly roundtable discussions with shift supervisors and others in leadership roles from across the state to talk about how the DOC can help attract and retain officers as well as how the DOC can continue to work together to protect the public.

Starting pay for officers is $2,214.43 per month with two salary increases within the first 18 months of employment. Included with their employment, officers receive full health insurance for their families.

“You can’t beat the benefits,” Correctional Officer and recent academy graduate Joshua Middleton said. “I had several opportunities in the area, but DOC had the best benefits and I am able to give back to the community in a way I wouldn’t have found in a different position at another place of employment.”

Middleton graduated from the SE Region Cadet Academy on Aug. 21. He and 4 of his fellow officers joined the approximately 1,500 correctional officers serving the state’s 17 facilities.

McALESTER – After a recent cadet graduation, the Jackie Brannon Correctional Center (JBCC) is at 100 percent staffing for correctional officers.

According to Department of Corrections (DOC) recruiting records, the JBCC facility is the only fully staffed prison in the state.

A recent spike in applicants for correctional officer positions has led to more academies and the DOC adding a special academy to accommodate the waiting list. The DOC is approximately 28 percent understaffed for correctional officers, a 12 percent decrease since July.

“It’s a relief to have a fully staffed facility,” JBCC Warden Jerry Chrisman said. “We have strong leadership with our current correctional officers, who will mentor the younger officers and show them what it takes to succeed in this career. They are in good hands and will be learning from the best.”

Last month, DOC Director Robert Patton sent a citation to the facility to commend the staff for their work. Director Patton has worked in corrections for more than 30 years and started as a correctional officer.

“The job of a correctional officer is not an easy one,” said Patton. “It takes heart, determination and guts to get up every day and face the challenges of working on a prison yard. It is more than a career. I appreciate Warden Chrisman’s effort to creating a motivational atmosphere and a place where people want to lace up their boots and come to work every day.”

Director Patton has recently been hosting monthly roundtable discussions with shift supervisors and others in leadership roles from across the state to talk about how the DOC can help attract and retain officers as well as how the DOC can continue to work together to protect the public.

Starting pay for officers is $2,214.43 per month with two salary increases within the first 18 months of employment. Included with their employment, officers receive full health insurance for their families.

“You can’t beat the benefits,” Correctional Officer and recent academy graduate Joshua Middleton said. “I had several opportunities in the area, but DOC had the best benefits and I am able to give back to the community in a way I wouldn’t have found in a different position at another place of employment.”

Middleton graduated from the SE Region Cadet Academy on Aug. 21. He and 4 of his fellow officers joined the approximately 1,500 correctional officers serving the state’s 17 facilities.