Virginia Cure

Virginia CURE is a state chapter of CURE, Citizens United for Rehabilitation of Errants. Our mission is to reduce crime through criminal justice reform. To achieve success, all concerned citizens must make an effort to be informed and participate in activities that encourage fair, humane, and responsible criminal justice and prison policies.
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VA Parole Board Chair to Visit Hampton Roads CURE Nov 18

Oct 27, 2014 | by admin

Need a job but getting ignored when you check the box about criminal history? Karen Brown (Virginia Parole Board Chairman) will tell us how she can help!

HOW IS THE VIRGINIA PAROLE BOARD DOING WITH THE NEW LAW (HB2103)
“If the Board denies the inmate parole, the Board is required to provide specific reasons for such denial in writing.”?
COME JOIN THE CONVERSATION.
VIRGINIA CURE –HAMPTON ROADS—
Tuesday, 18 NOV 2014
7:00pm 
at Norview Baptist Church,
1127 Norview Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23513
 
IF YOU HAVE CONVICTIONS ON YOUR POLICE RECORD AND ARE SEEKING EMPLOYMENT OR PROMOTIONS IT CAN BE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE YOU FACE AS A RETURNING CITIZEN!
THE VIRGINIA PAROLE BOARD CHAIRMAN WILL TELL US HOW MINIMIZE THIS PROBLEM WITH A “SIMPLE PARDONS” WHICH SHE OVERSEES!
 EXPUNGEMENTS IN VIRGINIA WHAT IS EXPUNGEMENT?
 Expungement is a process where an individual who has been arrested and charged with a crime, but who was NOT convicted, can have police and court records of the arrest and charges sealed from public view. This does NOT mean the records are destroyed. The records are taken away from public view and can only be seen if the court gives permission (such as to a law enforcement officer).
WHO IS ENTITLED TO OBTAIN AN EXPUNGEMENT?
A defendant in a criminal case who pleads “not guilty” and is then acquitted by a judge or jury.
A person in a civil action who is charged with contempt of court, but is found not guilty.
A defendant in a criminal case that the Commonwealth Attorney’s office decides not to prosecute (nolle prosequi) for all charges.
A defendant charged with assault and battery or other misdemeanor for which the defendant could also be sued in a civil action, if the injured person states in writing s/he has received satisfaction for the injury and the case is dismissed.
A person whose name or identification has been used without consent or authorization in a criminal case (identity theft).
A defendant convicted of a crime who later receives an absolute pardon.
Clemency
Solely the Governor has the authority to grant clemency and he may do so at his discretion.  This discretionary power allows each governor to establish his own guidelines and policies regarding the eligibility of those seeking clemency.
There are two types of clemency:  Restoration of Civil Rights and Pardons.
A restoration of rights restores the rights which are lost upon a felony conviction. These include the rights to vote, to run for and hold public office, to serve on juries and to serve as a Notary Public. It does not include the right to possess or transport any firearm or to carry a concealed weapon.
[If the Governor restores your rights, you may petition the circuit court of the jurisdiction in which you reside for a permit to possess or carry a firearm. The court may, in its discretion and for good cause shown, grant such a petition and issue a permit.]
Three Pardon Types
There are three types of pardons:
1. A Simple Pardon is a statement of official forgiveness. While it does not expunge (remove the conviction from) the record, it often serves as a means for the petitioner to advance in employment, education, and self-esteem. Evidence of good citizenship is required, as are favorable recommendations from the officials involved in the case and from the Virginia Parole Board.
2. A Conditional Pardon is available only to people who are currently incarcerated. It is usually granted for early release and involves certain conditions; if you violate these conditions, you could be put back in prison. There must be extraordinary circumstances for an inmate to be considered for such a pardon.

3. An Absolute Pardon is rarely granted because it is based on the belief that the petitioner was unjustly convicted and is innocent. An absolute pardon is the only

For more information, contact:

James Bailey, Regional Director
“Missing Voter Project”