Arkansas Cure

Arkansas CURE works to promote rehabilitation for the benefit of the community as a whole, and of the incarcerated individual through meaningful criminal justice reform by advocating for meaningful change through the legislative process.

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A new report by state prison officials estimates up to 100,000 people may be in solitary confinement

Sep 10, 2015 | by Jean Thrash

Arkansas has the highest percentage of men being held in solitary. The report found 7.5 per cent of Arkansas’ nearly 14,000 men are held in isolation for 30 days or more.

In most jurisdictions, administrative segregation had no fixed endpoint. The report found that only two states – Colorado and Georgia – impose any time limit on solitary confinement. In a substantial number of jurisdictions, people remained in segregation for more than three years, while many jurisdictions don’t even track the number of continuous days that individuals are held in solitary.

The study found that Black and Hispanic individuals were over-represented in administrative segregation. Of the 22 jurisdictions that responded to questions related to race, 21 jurisdictions contained a smaller percentage of White individuals in segregation than the total prison population. On average, Black individuals made up 47 per cent of the administrative segregation population versus 39 per cent of the total male prison population.  Hispanic individuals were 14 per cent of the administrative segregation population compared to 12 per cent of the total male prison population.

Of the jurisdictions surveyed, Arkansas has the highest percentage of men being held in solitary.  The report found 7.5 per cent of Arkansas’ nearly 14,000 men are held in isolation for 30 days or more.

The study also notably found that in 2013, more than 4,400 individuals were released directly from solitary confinement to the streets.

Solitary Watch